New Books for the week of Feb 25th

Christ-Centered Higher Education: Memory, Meaning, and Momentum for the Twenty-First Century

ChristCenteredIf the Christ-centered college or university did not exist, would it have to be invented? Back in the 1950s, the answer was in doubt. With few exceptions, Christian colleges wallowed in defensive self-doubt and divisive competition while under attack from the rising public sector. Students of American higher education predicted that they would soon become as extinct as the whooping crane. Rather then succumbing to doomsayers, leaders in Christian higher education bonded together around the commanding truth that all things come together in Jesus Christ. They drove their stake for the future in the integration of faith and learning as the reason for the existence of Christ-centered higher education. Out of this commitment came a renaissance movement of common cause and unprecedented cooperation through the Consortium of Christian Colleges and the Council for Christian Colleges & Universities. Will integration continue to be the energizing and all-pervasive influence that gives the Christ-centered institution its reason for existence? Trustees, presidents, deans and faculties in each generation must think and rethink the concept in the light of theological, academic, technological, and cultural change. David McKenna opens the conversation by remembering where we were, confirming who we are, and envisioning what we can be.

God at Work: Your Christian Vocation in All of Life by Gene Edward Veith, Jr.

God at Work

When you understand it properly, the doctrine of vocation–“doing everything for God’s glory”–is not a platitude or an outdated notion. This principle that we vaguely apply to our lives and our work is actually the key to Christian ethics, to influencing our culture for Christ, and to infusing our ordinary, everyday lives with the presence of God. For when we realize that the “mundane” activities that consume most of our time are “God’s hiding places,” our perspective changes.Culture expert Gene Veith unpacks the biblical, Reformation teaching about the doctrine of vocation, emphasizing not what we should specifically do with our time or what careers we are called to, but what God does in and through our callings–even within the home. In each task He has given us–in our workplaces and families, our churches and society–God Himself is at work. Veith guides you to discover God’s purpose and calling in those seemingly ordinary areas by providing you with a spiritual framework for thinking about such issues and for acting upon them with a changed perspective.

Stumping God: Reagan, Carter, and the Invention of a Political Faith by Andrew P. Hogue

stumpingFor more than three decades, American presidential candidates have desperately sought the conservative Evangelical vote. With an ever broadening base of support, the Evangelical movement in America may now seem to many a very powerful lobbyist on Capitol Hill. As Andrew Hogue shows, however, this was not always the case. In ‘Stumping God’ Hogue deconstructs the 1980 presidential election, in which Ronald Reagan would defeat Jimmy Carter and John B. Anderson, and uncovers a disproportionately heavy reliance on religious rhetoric–a rhetoric that would be the catalyst for a new era of presidential politics. Until 1980, the idea that conservative politics was somehow connected with conservative theology was distant from the American imagination. Hogue describes the varying streams of influence that finally converged by the Reagan-Carter election, including the rapidly rising Religious Right. By 1980, candidates were not only challenged to appeal rhetorically to a conservative religious base, but found it necessary to make public their once-private religious commitments. In compelling and illuminating fashion, ‘Stumping God’ explains the roots of modern religious politics and encourages readers to move beyond the haze of rhetorical appeals that–for better or worse–continually clouds the political process.

Why the Church Needs Bioethics: A Guide to Wise Engagement with Life’s Challenges Edited by John F. Kilner

whythechurchIn a world where incredible medical technologies are possible …does ‘can do’ mean ‘should do’? Why the Church Needs Bioethics helps you understand and constructively engage bioethical challenges with the resources of Christian wisdom and ministry. Three rich and true-to-life case studies illustrate the urgency of such bioethical issues as reproductive and genetic technologies, abortion, forgoing treatment, assisted suicide, stem cell research, and human enhancement technologies. Leading Christian voices bring biblical and theological perspective to bear on the incredible medical technologies available today; mobilize useful insights from health care, law, and business; and demonstrate the powerful ways the church can make a difference through counseling, pastoral care, intercultural ministry, preaching, and education. This book equips students, church and lay leaders, and people in health-related fields with the knowledge to make faithful bioethical decisions and to help foster a world where human beings are shown respect as people created in the image of God.Contributors to Why the Church Needs Bioethics include leading Bible and theology scholars, such as D. A. Carson and Kevin Vanhoozer; leaders in the areas of preaching (Greg Scharf) and ethics (Scott Rae); and 15 other experts in the fields of biblical-theological studies, ministry, communication, business, law, healthcare, and bioethics.

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About jessicashuck

Jessica is a Library Associate at Cornerstone University's Miller Library and a future librarian. Currently, she is working on her MLIS through the University of South Florida. In her free time, she enjoys reading, crafting, and spending time with her husband and two dogs.
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