What’s New at the Library this Week?

Power, Politics and the Fragmentation of Evangelicalism: From the Scopes Trial to the Obama Administration by Kenneth J. Collins.

Power. Evangelicals have often sought it for national influence, and have often lamented its loss. But has this pursuit of cultural clout been the key to social transformation or the road to an ideological cul-de-sac?

The Eternal Generation of the Son: Maintaining Orthodoxy in Trinitarian Theology by Kevin N. Giles.

Should all Christians, especially evangelicals, hold on to the doctrine of the eternal generation of the Son? What is lost if we don’t?Theologian Kevin Giles defends the historically orthodox and ecumenical doctrine of the eternal generation of the Son of God. He argues on biblical, historical and theological bases that, given its fundamental meaning, this formulation is indispensable, irreplaceable and faithful to Christian revelation. The book will be especially helpful in the current discussion of this doctrine. It will also be of interest to students, pastors and laypersons who want to delve into the Christian understanding of the identity of the Son of God and serious study of trinitarian theology.

Haggai, Zechariah and Malachi: an introduction and commentary by Andrew E. Hill.

These commentaries are designed to help the reader of the Bible understand what the text says and what it means. The Introduction to each book gives a concise but thorough treatment of its authorship, date, original setting and purpose. Following a Structural Analysis, the Commentary takes the book section by section, drawing out its main themes, and also comments on individual verses and problems of interpretation.

The Theological Messages of the Old Testament Books by Robert D.Bell.

God says that all Scripture is “profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness.” But preaching from, teaching through, or even studying weighty books such as Leviticus or 1 Chronicles can discourage both disciples and expositors. How can modern Christians be true to each book’s message and still make relevant application to their own lives?

Screen Jesus: Portrayals of Christ in Television and Film by Peter Malone.

Since the dawn of film in the 1890s, religious themes and biblical subjects have been a staple of cinema. One of the earliest focuses of screen presentations was the Bible, especially the New Testament and the Gospels. In Screen Jesus: Portrayals of Christ in Television and Film, Peter Malone takes a close look at films in which Jesus is depicted. From silent renditions of The Passion Play to 21st-century blockbusters like The Passion of the Christ, Malone examines how the history of Jesus films reflects the changes in artistic styles and experiments in cinematic forms for more than a century. In addition to providing a historical overview of the Jesus films, this book also reveals the changes in piety and in theological understandings of the humanity and divinity of Jesus over the decades. While most of the Jesus films come from the United States and the west, an increasing number of Jesus films come from other cultures, which are also included in this study. Fans and scholars interested in the history of religious cinema will find this an interesting read, as will students and teachers in cinema and religious studies, church pastors, parish groups, and youth ministry.

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