New Book Titles for July 4-8


An ESL ministry handbook : contexts and principles by Michael Pasquale (Credo House Publishers, 2011).

An ESL Ministry Handbook is a practical guide to help individuals and churches provide quality English as a Second Language programs.

The 7-day financial makeover : how to transform your financial future in a week by Eric J. Hoogstra (Credo House Publisers, 2010).

Ultimately, our goal should be to live the best life we can with the money we have. Unfortunately, many Americans are trying to live with money they don t have and are not experiencing the best life possible. Eric Hoogstra combines common fiscal sense and eternal wisdom in a concentrated form and in a succinct plan. Follow his recommended plan for the next seven days and beyond, and you are guaranteed to free your soul and your wallet from stress and liberate yourself toward the life you so deeply desire. –Mitch Anthony, Author, The New Retirementality, President, The Financial Life Planning Institute

The language of science and faith : straight answers to genuine questions by Karl W. Giberson & Francis S. Collins (IVP Books, 2011).

For too long, followers of Jesus have been told they have to make a choice–between science and Christianity, reason and belief, their intellectual integrity and their faith. The Language of Science and Faith is a readable and comprehensive resource for the thoughtful Christian who refuses to choose. Giberson and Collins tackle difficult topics with charity, accessibility and integrity, moving the origins conversation forward in a way that honors God and builds up the church. This is a must-read for those who want to love the Lord with their heart, soul, mind and strength. –Rachel Held Evans, author of Evolving in Monkey Town

Justice in love by Nicholas Wolterstorff (Eerdmans, 2011).

For the past three decades Nicholas Wolterstorff has crafted a devastating philosophical critique of and a bracing Christian alternative to John Rawls’s Theory of Justice. In this exquisite new book of political theology, he tours the perennially contested questions of eros and agape, rule and equity, discipline and mercy, responsibility and forgiveness, justice and righteousness. Learned, judicious, strikingly innovative, and crystal clear, this book has all the marks of yet another Wolterstorff classic in the making. — John Witte Jr. Emory University

Existential reasons for belief in God : a defense of desires & emotions for faith by Clifford Williams (IVP Academic, 2011).

We humans–most of us, anyway, most of the time–are rational, truth-seeking agents. But equally we are emotional creatures with existential needs, and we seek to meet those needs. Traditional Christian apologetics focuses on the former characteristic, offering evidence to believe that the Christian faith is true. Clifford Williams calls our attention to a second approach, one aimed at the second characteristic. Echoing thinkers such as Pascal and Kierkegaard, Williams’s ‘existential argument’ shows that Christian faith can be justified–we may properly believe–just because faith satisfies certain existential needs. Williams develops his argument in a philosophically rich way, augmented with examples showing how for many people faith is engendered and sustained by existential arguments. Deep insights abound as Williams considers and rejects common objections to existential arguments. In the end, Williams doesn’t reject evidential arguments, but urges us to pay closer attention to our emotional needs and their role in faith formation. I highly recommend this significant addition to the apologetic literature. –Garrett J. DeWeese, Professor of Philosophy and Philosophical Theology, Talbot School of Theology, Biola University

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About Eric

Eric Bradley is a academic librarian. He does not moonlight as a Mixed Martial Arts fighter or Los Angeles studio singer, although may be seen playing French Horn in a community band or adding another tune book to his hymnal collection.
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