New Items for week of February 7, 2011

Blues Music and Gospel Proclamation
Blues Music and Gospel Proclamation: The Extraordinary Life of a Courageous East German pastor by Theo Lehmann (Wipf & Stock, 2008).

Born in 1934 in Dresden, Germany, Theo Lehmann lived through both the Nazi era and the Communist-ruled German Democratic Republic (GDR). Ordained in the Lutheran Church of Saxony, he was called to an urban parish in Chemnitz. There he introduced a youth worship service marked by contemporary music, uncompromising preaching of the gospel message, and calls to discipleship in Christ that attracted thousands. Lehmann then embarked on an itinerant ministry of youth evangelism with Jörg Swoboda, a Baptist musician and youth leader. He gained the undying enmity of the Communist regime, was under constant surveillance by the dreaded secret police, and was rejected by many of his own ministerial colleagues. –From Description

Harmony: A New Way of Looking at our World by Prince Charles of Wales with Tony Juniper and Ian Skelly (Harpercollins, 2010).

The author, often maligned and trivialized by the press, shows himself here to be a serious thinker, writer, historian and visionary. I believe he is the best product of the British monarchy to emerge in the past two hundred years. His book clearly analyzes the root causes of our separation from a state of harmony, and predicts the consequences of this estrangement from the natural world. Widely read himself, he interjects his personal thoughts and opinions into the narrative, thereby creating an informal approach to what could have been a dry text. –Wendy Victor

By Design: Evidence for Nature’s Intelligent Designer – the God of the Bible by Jonathan Sarfati (Creation Book Publishers, 2008)

When master logician/scientist Jonathan Sarfati takes on another front of the creation/evolution battle, his fans know they’re going to experience an intellectual feast of cut-and- thrust philosophical swordsmanship with the opponents of Genesis creation/ID. But readers are in for an additional treat, too – his passion (not revealed in his previous books) for digging into the details of life’s breathtaking designs. –Dr. Carl Wieland

Feast: Why Humans Share Food by Martin Jones (Oxford University Press, 2008)

In presenting his thoughtful argument for the development of social and ritual meals, Martin skillfully lays a middle path between those who would explain everything by natural selection and those interested in the grammar of meaning systems. –Library Journal

Is God a Moral Monster? Making Sense of the Old Testament God by Paul Copan (Baker Books, 2011).

Copan takes on current New Atheist biblical critics and powerfully addresses virtually every criticism they have raised. I know of no other book like this one, and it should be required reading in college and seminary courses. –J. P. Moreland

Between Truth and Fiction: A Narrative Reader in Literature and Theology edited by David Jasper and Allen Smith (Baylor University Press, 2010).

Between Truth and Fiction offers a carefully thought through selection of texts in theology and literature. But it provides much more than this. The often wholly unexpected texts illustrate vividly the ever changing shape of the literature and theology canon, while the powerful extended essays and the accompanying comments are themselves a provocative invitation to hermeneutical challenges which should surprise and delight the reader. –George Newlands


Inside The Voyage of the Dawn Treader: A Guide to Exploring the Journey beyond Narnia
by Devin Brown (Baker Books, 2010).

If Edmund were to finally receive a belated gift from Father Christmas, he would be lucky if it were a copy of my good friend Devin Brown’s book. Like Lewis, Devin is somebody who adores great stories and effortlessly weaves them throughout his book. As a result, upon finishing Devin’s book the reader is hungry not only to read more of Lewis, but to read more great literature. This book will surely be banned at Experiment House. –Michael Flaherty

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About Eric

Eric Bradley is a academic librarian. He does not moonlight as a Mixed Martial Arts fighter or Los Angeles studio singer, although may be seen playing French Horn in a community band or adding another tune book to his hymnal collection.
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